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Hannes Kulovits, Vienna University of Technology, made this presentation at the Planning the Future with Planets preservation tutorial at the Austrian Computer Society on 15 April 2008. The slides build on the 'Identification of Institutional Setting and Selection of Sample Records' session. They present a practical introduction to defining preservation strategies and alternatives, evaluating the usefulness of strategies, developing and running experiments, evaluating experiments; creating comparable measured values; setting importance factors and analysing results. [PDF, 656KB]

Design for recommender system in Plato

Posted on 25th November 2009
This document contains the first iteration for a design for recommender systems in the preservation planning tool Plato. The integration of such support systems shall reduce the effort needed to create a preservation plan and enable preservation planning for less experienced users. [PDF, 234KB]

Developing practical approaches to active preservation
Adrian Brown (The National Archives UK)

Posted on 7th September 2007
Abstract: "The National Archives has been actively collecting, preserving, and making available electronic records for nearly 10 years. They are therefore developing a range of practical solutions to the active preservation of electronic records, using an extensible service oriented architecture and a central technical registry (PRONOM).
This paper describes TNA’s methodologies for characterisation, preservation planning, and preservation action, the technologies being adopted to implement them, and the role of PRONOM in supporting these services. It describes how this approach fits with international research programmes, and the types of preservation service which TNA may be able to provide externally in future."

The paper was accepted for presentation at the 2nd International Digital Curation Conference Digital Data Curation in Practice held on November 21-22 2006 in Glasgow, Scotland
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Developing practical approaches to active preservation
Adrian Brown (The National Archives, UK)

Posted on 20th October 2009
The National Archives has been actively collecting, preserving, and making available electronic records for nearly 10 years. They are therefore developing a range of practical solutions to the active preservation of electronic records, using an extensible service oriented architecture and a central technical registry (PRONOM).
This paper describes TNA’s methodologies for characterisation, preservation planning, and preservation action, the technologies being adopted to implement them, and the role of PRONOM in supporting these services. It describes how this approach fits with international research programmes, and the types of preservation service which TNA may be able to provide externally in future.

The paper was presented at the 2nd International Digital Curation Conference Digital Data Curation in Practice held on November 21-22 2006 in Glasgow, Scotland.

In: The International Journal of Digital Curation, Issue 1, Volume 2 | 2007, pp. 3-11 [PDF, 382KB]

Digital Archaeology: Recovering Digital Objects from Audio Waveforms
Mark Guttenbrunner, Mihai Ghete, Annu John, Chrisanth Lederer, Andreas Rauber (all Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria)

Posted on 20th October 2009
Specimens of early computer systems stop working every day. It is necessary to prepare ourselves for the upcoming situation of having storage media and no working systems to read data from these carriers. With storage media residing in archives for already obsolete systems it is necessary to extract the data from these media before it can be migrated for long term preservation.
One storage medium that was popular for home computers in the 1980s was the audio tape. The first home computer systems allowed the use of standard cassette players to record and replay data. Audio tapes are more durable than old home computers when properly stored. Devices playing this medium (i.e. tape recorders) can be found in working condition or can be repaired as they are made out of standard components. By re-engineering the format of the waveform the data on such media can then be extracted from a digitized audio stream.

This paper presents a case study of extracting data created on an early home computer system, the Philips G7400.
The original data formats were re-engineered and an application was written to support the migration of data stored on tapes without using the original system. This eliminates the necessity of keeping an obsolete system alive for preserving access to data on storage media meant for this system. Two different methods to interpret the data and eliminate possible errors in the tape were implemented and evaluated on original tapes recorded 20
years ago. Results show that with some error correction methods parts of the tapes are still readable, even without the original system. It also becomes clear, that it is easier to build solutions now when the original systems are still available.

The paper was presented by Mark Guttenbrunner, Vienna University of Technology, at iPres 2009, 5-6 October 2009, in San Francisco, California. [PDF, 241KB]
This presentation relates to the paper Digital Archaeology: Recovering Digital Objects from Audio Waveforms which deals with a case study of extracting data created on an early home computer system, the Philips G7400.

The original data formats were re-engineered and an application was written to support the migration of data stored on tapes without using the original system. This eliminates the necessity of keeping an obsolete system alive for preserving access to data on storage media meant for this system. Two different methods to interpret the data and eliminate possible errors in the tape were implemented and evaluated on original tapes recorded 20 years ago. Results show that with some error correction methods parts of the tapes are still readable, even without the original system. It also becomes clear, that it is easier to build solutions now when the original systems are still available.

The presentation was given by Mark Guttenbrunner, Vienna University of Technology, at iPres 2009, 5-6 October 2009, in San Francisco, California. [PDF, 255KB]
The Royal Library in Copenhagen is the National Library of Denmark. In 2008, it merged with the Danish Folklore Archives. As a result, the Royal Library has need to ingest a rapidly growing collection of materials from published works, manuscripts, documents and maps to pictures, photographs and music representing Danish folklore and that of other parts of the world. This case study examines how the two institutions have used Planets characterisation and planning tools to profile digital objects before transferring them to the Royal Library's digital preservation store. [PDF, 1513KB]

Digital Preservation Metadata

Posted on 14th May 2009
This presentation was delivered by Angela Dappert (British Library) during the joint DPE/Planets/CASPAR/nestor training event, ‘The Preservation challenge: basic concepts and practical applications’ in Barcelona, 23-26 March 2009.
Metadata can play a vital role in enabling the effective management, discovery, and re-usability of digital information. Digital preservation metadata provides provenance information, supports and documents preservation activity, identifies technical features, and aids in verifying the authenticity of a digital object. The presentation gives and introduction to Digital preservation metadata and preservation metadata in practise. [PDF, 1096KB]
In order to develop an appropriate decision making process that will support the management and preservation of digital information new methods are needed and are developed within different European projects, such as Delos and Planets. This presentation by Hans Hofman (Nationaal Archief Netherlands) discusses these new methods and explores the main components of the preservation planning process. An important part is the identification of requirements in a given business context.
The presentation was delivered during the joint DPE/Planets/CASPAR/nestor training event, ‘The Preservation challenge: basic concepts and practical applications’ in Barcelona, 23-26 March 2009. [PDF, 325KB]
Jeffrey van der Hoeven (National Library of the Netherlands) presented the emulator 'Dioscuri' at DigCCurr 2009 in Chapel Hill, USA, on 1-3 April 2009.
Dioscuri is an x86 computer hardware emulator written in Java, designed to ensure that documents and programs from the past can still be accessed in the future. The Dioscuri emulator has two key features: it is durable and flexible. [PDF, 3009KB]

Dioscuri: Emulation for digital preservation

Posted on 27th September 2007
This is a presentation by Jeffrey van der Hoeven, National Library of the Netherlands, given at the 2nd Planets, CASPAR and DPE annual conference, held on 5-6 September 2007 in Lisbon, Portugal. It presents the the Dioscuri project, funded by the National Library and National Archive of the Netherlands in 2004, after having recognised the need for emulation, especially for rendering complex digital objects in the future without affecting their authenticity and integrity. Work within Planets on emulation continues from the Dioscuri project. The presentation also contains a useful diagram showing how emulation tools and services fit with other Planets tools and services. [PPT, 3106KB]

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